Registering on twitter without Phone Verification – Part 1

Ansar Al Khilafah technical Team presents:

Registering on twitter without Phone Verification – Part 1

see also Regestering on twitter without phone varification part 2 and The Blocklist Tutorial

Twitter works on the principle that if your IP address is based outside of the United States, then when registering an account, you will need to provide phone or SMS verification. You can choose not to provide it, but if you do so, Twitter will eventually ask you to provide it, and if not provided then, your account is automatically suspended by their algorithm.

There are a few ways around this if you are outside of the US, or even in the US, and don’t want to use your real IP address.

The first is to use a Proxy VPN which would allow you to select a US-based IP address to register with Twitter. For example, use CyberGhost VPN (http://www.cyberghostvpn.com/), which is free.

After you have installed it and activated it, open up the program. It eventually takes you to a world map. On the bottom-left, choose “Simulated Country”:

image

Then scroll down this list and choose the USA. The server maybe full, so choose a time when it is not full:

image

Then proceed to register on Twitter whilst using this USA IP-address. Once registered and confirmed through email, you no longer have to use CyberGhost VPN. You can use Tor Brwoser Bundle.

Remember, make sure your email address was not registered using your real IP address, and make sure it is not one of the big three (Gmail, Yahoo or Microsoft). You can use a Tor-based email such as Mail2Tor (http://mail2tor2zyjdctd.onion), Sigaint (http://sigaintevyh2rzvw.onion/) or RuggedInbox.com (https://ruggedinbox.com/). You should only register for these email services whilst using the Tor Browser Bundle (https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser.html.en).

There is the inherent danger that if you are a particularly high-value target, that the intel agencies may ask Twitter what IP address was used to first register with Twitter. They will then give over the CyberGhost IP-address used to register. It maybe be possible then for the intel agencies to ask CyberGhost to hand over the real IP address of the person who used their proxy IP address to register with Twitter at that time and on that day. While unlikely, especially if you are a low-value target, keep in mind that this method does not provide 100% anonymity if the intel agencies truly consider you a high-value target.

If you truly think you are under surveillance, then know that VPNs are not secure. According to Der Spiegel:

VPN Security only Virtual

One example is virtual private networks (VPN), which are often used by companies and institutions operating from multiple offices and locations. A VPN theoretically creates a secure tunnel between two points on the Internet. All data is channeled through that tunnel, protected by cryptography. When it comes to the level of privacy offered here, virtual is the right word, too. This is because the NSA operates a large-scale VPN exploitation project to crack large numbers of connections, allowing it to intercept the data exchanged inside the VPN — including, for example, the Greek government’s use of VPNs. The team responsible for the exploitation of those Greek VPN communications consisted of 12 people, according to an NSA document SPIEGEL has seen.

The NSA also targeted SecurityKiss, a VPN service in Ireland. The following fingerprint for Xkeyscore, the agency’s powerful spying tool, was reported to be tested and working against the service:

fingerprint(‘encryption/securitykiss/x509’) = $pkcs and ( ($tcp and from_port(443)) or ($udp and (from_port(123) or from_por (5000) or from_port(5353)) ) ) and (not (ip_subnet(‘10.0.0.0/8’ or ‘172.16.0.0/12’ or ‘192.168.0.0/16’ )) ) and ‘RSA Generated Server Certificate’c and ‘Dublin1’c and ‘GL CA’c;

According to an NSA document dating from late 2009, the agency was processing 1,000 requests an hour to decrypt VPN connections. This number was expected to increase to 100,000 per hour by the end of 2011. The aim was for the system to be able to completely process “at least 20 percent” of these requests, meaning the data traffic would have to be decrypted and reinjected. In other words, by the end of 2011, the NSA’s plans called for simultaneously surveilling 20,000 supposedly secure VPN communications per hour.

VPN connections can be based on a number of different protocols. The most widely used ones are called Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) and Internet Protocol Security (Ipsec). Both seem to pose few problems for the NSA spies if they really want to crack a connection. Experts have considered PPTP insecure for some time now, but it is still in use in many commercial systems. The authors of one NSA presentation boast of a project called FOURSCORE that stores information including decrypted PPTP VPN metadata.

Using a number of different programs, they claim to have succeeded in penetrating numerous networks. Among those surveilled were the Russian carrier Transaero Airlines, Royal Jordanian Airlines as well as Moscow-based telecommunications firm Mir Telematiki. Another success touted is the NSA’s surveillance of the internal communications of diplomats and government officials from Afghanistan, Pakistan and Turkey.

Ipsec as a protocol seems to create slightly more trouble for the spies. But the NSA has the resources to actively attack routers involved in the communication process to get to the keys to unlock the encryption rather than trying to break it, courtesy of the unit called Tailored Access Operations: “TAO got on the router through which banking traffic of interest flows,” it says in one presentation.http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/inside-the-nsa-s-war-on-internet-security-a-1010361.html

So if you are under surveilance, there is a chance that your VPN connection can be decrypted while you are using it. Their systems can automatically detect when you are using a VPN and then hijack it. So if you are under surveilance, do not use this method.

This danger does not apply to registering with the email services I mentioned as you registered with them through Tor, which as of our current understanding, is secure.

2 comments on “Registering on twitter without Phone Verification – Part 1

  1. asdf says:

    or you can use Next plus or textplus app on your andriod to get a fake number and register

    Like

  2. MakeDuaAkhi says:

    Assalam Alykom WRWB my beloved brothers in Islam.
    May Allah SWT bless you, save you and grant you Jannat Alfirdaws, a place beside our beloved Prophet Mohammad PBUH, for your amazing & usefull work. Amin.
    I had a suggestion regarding this twitter issue. One will be able to do it from TOR, and bypass the phone verification.

    1. In Tor browser, go to Manymo.com (An online Android emulator)
    2. Click on “Launch this dropbox demo now” button
    3. Press home button and open browser
    4. Search for “Twitter apk” and download the LATEST!! (Only latest worked for me [V 5.89.0-alpha.365 from ApkMirror.com] other asked for #)
    5. And register using your anonymous email (eg. from Tutanota.com)
    6. After registration you can open it in normal Tor browser tab

    Note>
    *Press “Ctrl+” to zoom
    *If you have problem typing “@”, change your keyboard to English and try “shift2”
    *If doesn’t work. Maybe new identity, restarting Tor will work. Or maybe download a VPN in it.
    *You can download Talkatone apk in it and get a free number for web.telegram.org

    If it works and is usefull you can create a tutorial on it, InshaAllah.
    If there’s anything i can help with, please tell, i will die for it, and i will be more than happy.

    Please make dua for me. 🙂

    Assalam Alykom

    Your brother in Islam

    Like

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